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developing today in egypt. what we're told is a volatile of mix of protestors gathered to denounce a recent power grab by their democratic leader. earlier we saw violent clashes as president mohammed morsi said the far reaching powers he just granted himself, basically saying he can ignore the courts are just temporary. the thousands gathered in the streets of kaj roar not so sure. they are making their doubts known with a round of protests this afternoon. coming up we will speak with ralph peters about what happened to the promise of democracy in this country and what the rice of a powerful group of islamic hard liners means to america. ralph says the future of egypt is literally on the line today. there was also some breaking news a couple of hours ago in the fast and furious investigation, that's the gun-running sting operation gone bad. and then the probe that led to a multiyear knock down drag out fight between congress and the department of justice, the one wanting the documents and the facts, and the department of justice not wanting to turn it all over. you may remember that attorne
continued at this hour in cairo in meetings reportedly taking place involving the prime minister of egypt, the prime minister of turkey as well as the emir trying to come up with a cease-fire there are indications the talks are continuing but here on the ground they plan to implement some kind of ground incursion into gaza if necessary. the military has been offered to draft as many as 57,000 reservists. you can see roads are closed off and see and hear an increased amount of military activity. if there is not a diplomatic solution soon it looks like the violence is going to be ratcheted up. >> heather: david lee miller. thank you. >> gregg: let's take a look. so far 57 rockets have landed inside israel. that doesn't include the 25 rockets that have been intercepted by israel's iron dome. since the started the pillar of defense over 400 rockets and miles have hit hundreds more have been intercepted. how exactly does the iron dome missile defense work? they calculate each rocket's trajectory and only intercepted those that will hate target. this is iron dome to a vast array of sensors to d
a deal before that happens will not work. the key to this -- egypt 40 years ago signed a peace treaty for israel. for 40 years they have not shot at each other. this is a different egypt now. it will all be about egypt. egypt has a really tight line to walk. if it somehow joins with the muscle burn brotherhood, america will cut them of their aid. i think egypt tries to walk right down the middle. i do not think they get involved dagen: do so with the president and prime minister was saying her in the last week. >> yes. the egyptian president worries that the way he came to power was they got rid of the last dictator. if he does not look sympathetic to the islamic cause and into israel, they will say who needs you. connell: as always, k.t. mcfarland, thank you for coming on. >> thank you. connell: we have some breaking news before we move on. the justice department has filed a lawsuit against ebay. they are saying that the agreement illuminated a significant former competition for the employees. watch ebay today. at the moment, the stock is up $0.56. the state of california had a simil
the president of egypt morsi, and the president of turkey. this is all part of an ongoing effort, as i pointed out to keep the violence escalating. there are positive indications of some movement there, but still, this violence ongoing there, viktor. >> there's a lot, dan, to discuss about the trip and this asia summit. it was really telling, and i truly sent it out through a tweet when someone asked about burma, and the president said this is not an endorsement. it's an acknowledgment of the reform. tell us more about the message for this trip. >> the president is responding to some criticism from some corners saying this visit is too soon. the administration did send secretary of state hillary rodham clinton healthing there last year, and they have an ambassador there, and many believe that's enough because it is the beginning of a long journey, the administration says, essentially the first few miles of a long journey. what the president -- the point the president was trying to make and others inside the administration is if you were to sit back and wait for there to be a perfect democracy
write the link between hamas and the muslim brotherhood is a concern. how vital is egypt's role given that in the gaza conflict right now? we know they're meeting right now. >> i think egypt is the key. they're the pivot here. what we're seeing is a situation where egypt really does not want to be put in a position where israel goes in to gaza. if that's the case, then the pressure is from within egypt from the muslim brotherhood, from the population, are going to be very intense. the last thing egypt wanted to do as a time when it needs to correct and deal with tremendous economic challenges is to be in a situation where if it threatens the peace treaty with israel, it guarantees it loses all the assistance from the outside. so they have a relationship with hamas because the muslim brotherhood and hamas are basically one in the same. hamas is on outgrowth of the egyptian muslim brotherhood. on the one hand, there's a link, there's a psychological connection, there's an emotional connection. on the other hand, they're the seen yore partner and hamas is a junior partner. the last thing
station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: egypt's leaders tried today to mediate a truce between israel and hamas, but there was no outward sign of progress. instead, the two sides traded hundreds more air strikes and rocket attacks. in gaza, palestinians reported more than 100 people killed so far, more than half of them civilians. we have two reports from independent television news, beginning with john ray in gaza. (gunfire). >> reporter: two sides talking peace but conducting a war. fairly a lull in hostilities before an israeli air strike killed another militant leader inside a building used by local and world media. this was already the day of the dead when bodies followed bodies from morgue to cemetery shrouded in the green flag of hamas and carried along on a seething river of fury. no surrender, this man shouts. it's either us or israel in this land. these are the dead from one family: four children who died with their father and mother, their aunts and their sisters. the house where they lived and perished in an instant has been wiped from the earth, whether thi
, they find egypt, turkey and other countries of the region are playing a much more proactive role in this crisis. >> fuad joining us in new york. fuad, hillary clinton is going to be meeting with mahmoud abbas, with the palestinian authority, with fatah, in the west bank. there's a lot of observers saying that's sort of a face-saving move, trying to help him out, he's sort of been sidelined in all of this. who comes out of this among the palestinian group stronger? does hamas emerge stronger no matter what happens and what does that mean moving forward for u.s. relations with palestinian groups? the u.s. does not recognize hamas, it's been trying to deal with the palestinian authority but if mahmoud abbas has lost power through all this, what does that mean moving forward to where getting some longer term peace deal? >> to be honest with you, anderson, i don't think either palestinian faction comes out ahead. i think the palestinian people have known now six decades of futility, if you will. they have never been able to formulate what they need to do with their own life. they have
. and "out front" tonight, cease-fire. 142 people were killed in gaz why and five in israel, egypt helped negotiate a temporary truce which took he fleeffect a at night in tel aviv. it was met with gunfire in the streets of gaza city. it is fragile. israeli defense forces say there are five rockets launched from gaza since the cease-fire went into effect. and prime minister benjamin netanyahu's statement was cautious. he said he was willing to give the egyptian cease-fire a chance before there is a need to use greater force. not exactly a ringing endorsement. here's the key thing, while the united states got involved with a visit from hillary clinton this deal was not brokered by the usa. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership that has long made this country a corner stone of regional stability and peace. >> seemingly unexpected leader was egypt's mohamed morsi, a man we've seen at rallies where egyptians chan egyptians chanted we are hamas. it's an impressive feat and the first time that israel has ever negotiated
away and bring you up to speed with the headlines. egypt's president standing hard on his decree saying hey, it's only temporary. it didn't go over well. they demand that morsi lifts his rule. even larger demonstrations are planned for tomorrow. at least 117 people are dead after a massive fire at a clothing factory in bangladesh. it happened just outside the capital city of daka. you can see that every window is lit with flames. some workers did try to escape by jumping out those windows. 200 people were injured. officials say there were 200 workers mostly women, in the factory. they expect the death toll to rise. >>> china has successfully landed a fighter jet on an aircraft carrier for the very first time. china's official news agency says the aircraft carrier was originally being built for the old soviet union. it's expected to hold 30 j-15 fighter jets. it could be years before that carrier is fully operational. >>> and a six-alarm fire kept firefighters busy overnight. it continued until the early morning hours. two firefighters were hurt when a wall collapsed on them. 20 apartmen
strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term that's got to be dominated by this region. >> i think so. it's the middle east, so there's good news and bad news. the good news is that the obama administration did an excellent job of supporting israel all through this. made israel feel moderate and the arabs feel realistic. the second piece of good news is that egypt, even under the muslim brotherhood, has an interest in having stability. that's very important. the bad news is the islamists are in control. in the palestinian areas with hamas and certainly in control in egypt. and there's going to be no peace as long as they are there in control, and u.s. policy has got to be a long, gradual process of trying to build up the non-islamists in the arab world, including in iran, across the region. >> that frames it. we'll hear more from you in the roundtable. >>> now let me turn to carl levin, chairman of course of the armed services committee in the senate. senator, to egypt. how concerned are you? is morsi a partner of the united states, or a p
. something both israel and the united states had hoped to avoid. meanwhile in egypt, for the seventh day in a row protestors marched in tahrir square to have the constitutional assembly begin voting on a new constitution. yet's egypt supreme court announced that on sunday, it would decide whether or not to dissolve the constitutional assembly so voting accelerated to perhaps render moot sunday's decision. many of whom are boycotting what they perceive to be a process hijacked by the muslim brotherhood. joining.me is james jeffrey former u.s. america west arena bass der to iraq. he served as the deputy to the president. thank you for your time. maybe you can unwind the chaos that is the middle east these days. >> thank you very much for having me here, eliot. first of all, behind the chaos are fundamental changes that manifest themselves first in things like the u.n. vote which follows the fighting in gaza over the past week between israel, the past two weeks between israel and hamas and also the arab spring in its ma
be able to do this. bear in mind, this is not the egypt of hosey you in barrack. the egyptian government now are muzz lum brotherhood, and israel is in a less-tenable negotiating position and they remain military strong but do they want to go in on the ground take hundreds of thousands of casualties? that they've within boehnered will cause them to lose the international support they have. it's one of those 50-50 chance things but it's looking like everybody is looking fair way out. the question is, in a region like this, is there a way out. >> schieffer: well allen pizzey, who always shows up in the worst place where's the workforce things are going on, thank you. cbs news correspondent charlie dag tais on the other side of the border in gaza. charlie, bring us up to speed. what is the situation like there. >> reporter: well, the mood here is extremely teps, and the biggest worry is this dangerous and unpredictable situation may be about to get worse. as we drove through the northern part gaza strip, we were shown a couple of bombed out buildings, and one looked to be three or four stor
identities. the fact that in egypt, the first thing they say is raise your head, you are an ejection, meaning be proud. so the question then is what happened? if this was true for a decade. there was nothing particularly unique about 2007 or 2011. whether there was a major economic crisis in egypt or tunisia. it was extraordinary and i don't think you can just blame it on economics. so the question is why didn't they do it before? i think we have the right answer. political sponsors have always assumed that it is not enough to have angry people to revolt. you have to organize and you have to get a lot of people through the streets and the government has to feel the heat. the fact you have a lot of angry people doesn't quite make it. governments understood that you can can't get people to the streets about organizing. the outline political parties. they kept tabs on social institutions. they put leaders in prison that challenge them. and they were under control. that is why some people are with us for the long haul. what happened over the last couple of years, we have been watching for a decad
to the far east speaking air force one with leaders from israel and egypt and turkey in a scramble to avoid further escalation of the violence. i welcome israel's counsel general and will israel invade gaza in >> the man date that the israel defense forces receive from the israeli government is remove the threat that is it a magnitude. and thousands of rockets that threaten and paralyze life in our count southerp region. the government gave a man date to remove and thatthis is not limited in time or in scope. it is it certainly a possibility and at this stage of the game we don't know yet. >> gaza is one of the defensest populated places. there will be more civilian casulties and don't worry about international pressure on israel. >> we enjoy legitimacy. the president of the united states expressed support in israel's right to arm itself. but we are concerned about innocent people being harmed because of the military action. and the government instructed it to minimize it as humanly possible the loss of life and damage to proper. >> i know that. and i know that israel always does that. and
the border tonight, egypt is leading intense international talks to broker a cease-fire. in cambodia today, president obama worked the phones calling israel and egypt's leaders. but back here, between the bombs, children were able to get outside and smile while others hoped for quieter times. >> we need peace. we need peace. if they stopped, if sharyn alfonsi stopped, i'm sure they will stop. >> reporter: but of course it's not that simple. both sides say they want peace but blame the other for preventing it. so tonight while many hope for a peace deal, the missiles keep flying. >> thanks. let's get perspective from our global anchor christiane amanpour in jerusalem. christiane, we know the situation where israel has been threatening for days to roll tanks into gaza. hamas calls it a bluff. do you have a better sense how real it is and when a ground invasion might happen? >> reporter: well, the threat is real. in fact, one israeli official told me today perhaps we'll have to make the sword clearer to energize the diplomacy. on the other hand, they want to make the diplomacy work and are re
that leave the quest for peace? ♪ >> jennifer: leaders from israel and gaza met in egypt today to discuss a possible drawdown with u.s. secretary general. for now, though the fighting continues. israeli air strikes killed nearly 40 people today, groups in gaza respondented by shooting nearly 100 rockets in israel. and on the israeli side of the border things appeared remarkably calm today. this picture has caused a stir online. it shows israelis watching passively as in-coming missiles sail over head. so why to israelis feel so comfortable out in the open as missiles fly above them? because of something called the iron dome. it's a defense system that uses radar to detect in-coming rockets and determine where they will land. if it is headed towards a populated area the gunner shoots the missile out of the sky. it is particularly good at detecting the smaller, older rockets that the palestinians use. iron dome has had an incredible 85% successful rate against the 300 rockets the palestinians have fired. the gulf missiles intercepted less than 10% of their target. iro
a role did she play and how big a role was this for the new government of egypt in fashioning this truce? >> reporter: well, any time a secretary of state travels, it's really important. and she was there for the closing. but all the american officials have said, this was egypt's proposal. america spoke to hamas through egypt. israel spoke to hamas through egypt. and president obama in his statement after the cease-fire said that he had urged the israeli prime minister to accept egypt's proposal. they definitely played the major role here in getting hamas to the table. i had an exclusive interview with the head of hamas, he said what they want out of it is a lifting of the siege. that may happen. what israel wants out of it is no more rockets into israel and no more supply of weapons to gaza. they might get that, as well. but of course, we're going to watch. it's fragile. >> and christiane, you heard the word the white house used today, tenuous, late this afternoon. what is your sense on the ground about how strong the truce is? >> reporter: well, it's really early days. it went into eff
a hundred lives. >> plus, outrage is growing in egypt, the police alliance being formed ahead of dualing protests set for next week. >>> plus, take a look at. this there he goes. the camel on the lam and the chaos that ensued after the animal made its escape in california. >>> another beautiful day across the entire bay area. coming up a temperature change you can expect for your sunday and when heavy rain has been added in our five-day forecast. n [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. in what world do potatoes, bacon and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant . >>> outrage is twoing in egypt tonight offer an apparent power grab by the country's president. it was the second day of protest after president morsi signed sweeping orders last week forbidding any legal challenges to his decisions. tonight hundreds of protesters remain in the
to be with you. i'm terrell brown. we begin in egypt. president mohamed morsi is scheduled to meet with senior judges today to discuss his move to assume absolute authority. morsi's power grab has triggered three days of violent protests, injuring hundreds. yesterday the egyptian stock market was down more than 9.5%. some u.s. lawmakers are urging caution in dealing with egypt's new islamic leader. >> we don't obviously want to see a democratically elected autocrat take the place of an undemocratically elected dictator. which was the case before that. >> holly williams is in cairo this morning. what's the latest there now? >> reporter: good morning, terrell. here in egypt we saw a lot more violence yesterday. in cairo, protesters who were angry with president morsi fought running street battles with the police. protesters throwing rocks, police firing back with tear gas. one person was killed when a crowd attacked the headquarters of the muslim brotherhood, the islamist group from which the president draws much of his support. beyond the violence you get the sense the president's opponents don
deduction. dean reynolds will tell us more about this later in the broadcast. that crisis in egypt is growing tonight. more than 200,000 protesters have filled cairo's tahrir square. they are angry with their new president, mohamed morsi who said last week that his decisions cannot be challenged by the courts which gives him almost absolute power. and our holly williams is above tahrir square in cairo this evening. holly, what's going on in the crowd behind you now? >> reporter: scott, we are seeing scenes reminisce september of the egyptian revolution. tahrir square was once again carpeted in people today, tens of thousands of people who poured in from every direction and they were chanting the same slogan that they chanted during the revolution. the people want the downfall of the regime. i was out on this square earlier today talking to people. some people are saying that they won't leave the streets until president morsi rescinds the decrees that have given him sweeping new powers. we've seen very low-level violence here in cairo, but in several other cities there have been vio
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
. they are interesting. see the list of countries that it was really at it in. iran, syria, lebanon, saudi arabia, egypt. sometimes it is called viper. a little bit confusing because they often times see things get kind of melted into each other. like you know, a very interesting whole incident. the size and sophistication of this was so great that i think the conclusion is clear that it was a government that was doing this. it is just unfathomable that it could then a smaller kind of scale operation. i think one of my colleagues is going to talk about estonia a little bit more, too. in 2007, estonia removed a statue, a soviet era statute and it caused turmoil between estonia and russia and lo and behold if it didn't become a lot of cyberattacks on mr. linea shutting down their telephone networks commissioning down their banking systems, websites and so on. government services and so on. it was never proven of his russia doing it, but the conclusion is that the very least of his russian hackers. in the end, nato, who is very active in helping estonia understand this, nato step dad and ultimately there's
will be back to take oua look at events in egypt. >> dw in december. her beauty shrouded in a legend. nefertiti, the pharaoh's queen. her world and must boss was discovered 100 years ago. 100 years of nefertiti. the laboratory in the ice fields of the antarctic. the research station where scientists gather key data on global climate change and arctic adventures. painter, graphic artist, innovator. the greek artists of the renaissance. who was he? we look at him and his influence to this day. december on dw. all broadcast times online. >> welcome back. eu foreign finance ministers meeting to discuss the fighting in the sinai region. there have been a string of attacks in the area. >> senior secured officers said to be in critical condition after being shot over the weekend. it claimed the lives of three policemen on saturday. have grown bolder since the egyptian revolution and the attacks have been spilling over into neighboring israel. >> hundreds of tanks and heavy artillery demonstrating in northern sinai directly on the israeli border. the egyptian army looking on as it prepares for war. thi
. egypt's president is a leader of the muslim brotherhood. the assassination will be seen as a calculated and dangerous insult. egypt strongly condemns what israel is doing in gaza. this is an unacceptable act, and we deeply condemn it. >> what has changed since the war? the west and israel have lost their most reliable friend, and egypt's president mubarak. they saw him as an indispensable part of the solution at times like this. >> heightened tensions in the middle east tonight. in other news from around the world, the united nations secretary general ban ki moon has set a report on the failure to attack civilians. -- has said a report on the failure to attack civilians will have a profound impact. in iraq, simultaneous car bomb attacks across the country have killed at least 17 people. dozens were injured. the attack struck baghdad and other cities. it is not clear if the attacks are the work of one group. across europe, tens of thousands have taken to the streets in protest of rising unemployment and government austerity measures. workers in spain, portugal, greece, and italy went out
for the recent killing of its military leader. key player is egypt. the country has a peace treaty with israel and is in position to exercise influence on hamas. last year's political revolution in egypt has created a new set of dynamics in the middle east. the former president hosni mubarak prioritized relations with the united states and israel. he regarded islamic forces as a threat. but current president mohamed morsi, who took office earlier this year, is more sympathetic to hamas and the palestinians. morsi formerly belonged to muslim brotherhood, and hamas is an offshoot of that organization. >> are negotiations happening behind the scenes as we speak? >> hamas leaders and the israeli envoy are set to be in cairo having indirect talks through egyptian negotiator. israel wants no determination in its time with egypt. u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon is scheduled to travel to cairo soon. and arab league secretary-general al arabi is set to go to gaza on tuesday. their mediation efforts are likely to have an impact on whether the fighting between israel and hamas continue. >> that was nh
. >> egypt has a lot of natural gas. that is really a attracting some investors to the country including this german engineering firm that runs several chemical factories in egypt. bmw also runs a production facility just outside of cairo. overall, german industries have been relatively modest that just 470 million euro per year. countries like china and turkey have a much stronger presence. >> the size of the german economy and the importance of the egyptian markets and tail that we have to work harder to increase the amount. 600 is important, but we would like to see more german investment in supporting egypt's, invest in supporting democracy. >> political events have been featured at the root conference, not only the arabs bring an opportunity in the region but also the current escalation of the israeli-palestinian conflict. it could complicate german- egyptian cooperation. what's the question as to what extent germany and the european union cannot, or want, to get involved in this conflict. it's interesting and the answer will depend on the latest development in the interests of the
of palestinians were being treated for injuries, word from egypt that a truce would be in place by the day's end came as a shock. then israel switched into really high gear, using the last few hours to target four cars of suspected militants. killing more than a dozen palestinians and two journalists from a pro hamas tv station. palestinian families suddenly began flooding into schools. they were frantic, overloaded with blankets, arriving packed in cars. on horse drawn carts, on tractors. we're doomed this woman said, we've been kicked out of our homes. more rushed into classrooms, looking for shelter. >> people are screening in here after these leaflets were dropped on their homes. they say in arabic, immediately evaluate your houses by order of the israeli military. it's created something of a panic here, and people think an israeli invasion could be imminent. israel said it dropped leaflets so civilians can avoid conflict zones. for many here, this felt like a cruel trick. hundreds of thousands of gazans ordered to move away from the israeli border with little notice. and told to move into a
. >>> i'm veroniy r n egypt visitors can get a revived glimpse of history. after six years of renovations and the arab spring uprising the tomb of king tut has been reopened. the u.s. ambassador to egypt received a special tour. the events marks 90 years since the tomb was first discovered. egypt is hoping to boost tourism industry. >>> to mexico city a musical trip to the church. mariachis came together to celebrate the feast day of patron saint cecelia. they marched through the streets in jackets and sombreros before a mass and concert. the journey is carried out every year on november 22nd. >>> one south korean park teaches visitors about a different kind of throne. the park is now home to what is said to be the world's first toilet culture park. statues and educational displays teach visitors the history of toilets and raises awareness about sanitation. the park even has additional exhibits inside of a toilet-shaped building. not every day you see that. >> someone had a little too much time on their hands and money and engineering skills. >>> you don't even know what to say. >> school
of cairo as the power struggle es is a rates in egypt, holly williams is there with the latest. >> you are still the prettiest girl at the ball. >> the actor larry hagman, j.r. ewing from the tv series dallas has died at the age of 81, manuel bojorquez looks back on his long career, and signs of the times, lucy kraft shows us the high tech advertisements that are becoming an inescapable site in modern day japan. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news." >> good evening, the i am chip reid, one day after the holiday season kickoff the nation's merchants have reason for joy, by one estimate the number of black friday shoppers was up 20 percent over the same day last year. the question now is whether shoppers can maintain the pace. terrell brown is watching the shoppers and their treasures in new york tonight. >> it is shaping up to be a record-setting opening to this holiday shopping season. one retailer at wal-mart the neigh nation's biggest said it sold nearly 5,000 items a second on thanksgiving night, as stores opened their doors this year earlier than ever.
. i'm randi kaye. we begin with the protests in egypt. over night protesters clashed with security forces. this was the scene in dammanhour north of cry row. reza sayah joining us. when can we expect the big one to start? >> reporter: the big one starts tuesday. they're calling for a 1 million main protest on tuesday. that's going to repeat calling for opponents of mr. morsi. but even today there are pro-morsi demonstrated takes place. they're going to be take place in cities outside of cairo. in some of these cities you have anti-morsi protesters as well. we've seen clashes in the early morning hours. they're going to attack the offices of the muslim brotherhood, supporters of the muslim brotherhood. things getting ugly there. the focal point of these anti-government protests remain here in ta rears square. i'm going to step aside to give you a live like look of what tahrir square looks like. most of them peaceful but we're still getting clashes and protests. right below they have set fire to an avis rental car center. you heard what sounded like a stun grenade. >> what you see he
kathy kae. if egypt hijacking the revolution or protecting it? mr. claims his new -- mr. mursi claims his new powers after claiming to protect it. and we show how israelis and iranians are coming together for science. yes, you heard that right. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. tonight, tensions are still high in egypt days after muhammed mercy -- muhammed mursi took sweeping powers. he claimed that only sovereign matters would be protected from judicial review. but on the street, thousands gathered in cairo for the funeral of an activist who died during clashes last week. more protests were planned for tuesday. late today, however, the muslim brotherhood decided to postpone its rally saying that it wanted to support the president after an outbreak of violence. joining me now is a local supporter of the revolution that removed the president in art -- remove president mubarak from power. m do you mursi is trying to -- do you i is tryingdent murss to hijack the revolution? >> he forgets that this is not about the muslim brother
israelis across the border. egypt warns the situation could escalate out of control. hello and welcome to gmt. it is 7:00 in the morning in new york and 8:00 in the evening here in beijing, where xi jinping has finally been confirmed as the country's next president. he will face a test like no other chinese leader before, having to preside over a party with major changes unleashed by market reforms. he says the party has to be more in touch with the people. >> after a mysterious, a secretive process, china has chosen its new leaders. the new party general secretary as expected, xi jinping. in front of the invited journalists, he wasted no time warning of the challenges ahead. >> the problems among our party members of corruption, taking bribes, being out of touch with the people, undue emphasis upon bureaucracy. >> little is known about xi jinping's preferred solutions to those challenges. seemingly different from his predecessors. he is also known to have close ties to the hardline military chief. chinese people have had no say in choosing their leaders begging the party has done that
more dead bodies came into the hospital as he was there. >> israel's operation was a disaster. egypt cannot remain silent. >> israeli air strikes are ongoing. israel says in response to continued palestinian rocket fire. there's no end to the violence in sight. jon tumilson, bbc news, gaza. -- jon donnison reporting. >> despite hopes that there might be a brief cease-fire from the egyptian prime minister when he came to visit today, but did not happen. >> no. there was meant to be a three- hour truce. both sides accuse the other of breaking that. hamas rockets being fired towards southern israel and militants in gaza say that israel launched attacks against the gaza, killing at least two civilians. there was evidence this morning in gaza city of israeli air strikes. any hopes of a long-term cease- fire hearour division. we have witnessed a large rockets being fired within the last hour towards tel aviv. we believe one of the rockets landed just short of tel aviv in an open area. i cannot see that israel would tolerate any long-range rockets being fired towards one of its largest citi
the gates of hell" on itself. egypt has recalled its ambassador to israel. in the meantime, the u.s. state department condemned the strikes fired from gaza and supporting israel's right to defend itself. i talked about all of this with sara sidner and also david kirkpatrick of "the new york times" and cnn's fareed zakaria. what is the latest on the attacks and the fallout? >> what we are seeing are more rockets coming into israel. there have been dozens of air strikes, as well since the killing of ahmed al jabarry, who is the leader of hamas' military wing, but he is also one of the founders of hamas. we are talking about a huge blow to hamas, and now the government there in gaza. israel is also telling us, and we've just heard this from its military spokesperson, that they are bringing in reservists, but they are considering a ground war, but have not yet given the go-ahead for that, but they are preparing. we know that they have been firing with the air with the air strikes, but we also know that they have been firing from the sea. their ships are anchored just off of the sea there in ga
: in the middle of all of this, it's a very unstable and frankly, unpredictable egypt. and it could be the key. >> yeah. egypt is absolutely a key player in this. right now it's new muslim brotherhood president, morsi, appears to be playing both sides. he has reportedly quietly given the green light to his intelligence services to put pressure on hamas to scale back on those rocket attacks, while publicly he is sending his prime minister to the gaza strip tomorrow in what will clearly be a show of solidarity with the palestinians. now, the egyptian calculation may be that by having their prime minister there, they will cause a pause in the fighting because israel will be reluctant to carry on with the air strikes and launch any kind of ground invasion while such a high ranking egyptian politician is there. that might, of course, help the palestinians. on the other hand, any pause in the fighting also gives a little more time for diplomacy to start work. but watching what egypt's leaders say and do in the next few days is going to be key in what happens next in this very tense situation. shep.
egypt's support, i repeat. he warned that quote, egypt today is different from egypt yesterday and the asias today are different from the asias yesterday. joining me now pj crowley. now a professor at george washington university. thank you for joining us. >> a pleasure, eliot. >> eliot: it seems to me with all this screaming and shouting about susan rice's testimony. the only thing that struck me for legitimate upset might be that general petraeus has said he believed it was a terrorist and the u.n. ambassador said originally it was not that. is that a legitimate area of some investigation by congress? >> in fairness to susan rice. she did not say it was an act of terrorist. she didn't rule it out either. she made clear her understanding of what happened would evolve over time. the significance of general petraeus on the hill is to begin a more fullsome process to answer questions that still don't have complete answers. the second dimension will be the completion of the accountability review board the arb that the state department is working on and will be released next month
. i don't pretend to know the solution. but i see that egypt -- president morsi has -- has gotten involved. i see this getting more complicated, an already complicated situation, getting more complicated. does that in any way increase our obligation or is there something strategeically than to issue condemnations. >> we have also had to -- the new head of government in egypt, recognize the importance of the truce with israel that egypt has had. some of the things he has done this week are very troubling toward that end. you upon, he went into gaza. while he was there, hamas launched more rockets, as a direct affront to that negotiated peace between egypt and israel that. piece is essential to u.s. security policy in the region. and so we are going to have to insist and mr. morsi honor that -- >> greta: what leverage do we have with him? >> well, i mean, certainly, there is a package of aid that the egyptians are asking for right now, for giveness of debt, is one aspect of that. you know, i think that the message needs to be sent that the largess of the american taxpayers doesn't c
expect? the people will be poor. >> maybe the position of egypt and today president mohammed morsi said this? >> translator: we are with them, what hurts us and the blood that flows from their children is our blood, too opinion. >> what did you make of that? >> we preferred to look at egyptian deeds rather than words. egypt has played a constructive role in the past in mediating cease-fires with gaza and we hope that the egyptians will continue to fulfill a constructive role in the future. >> you must have been disconcerted by the tone of president morsi's rhetoric there. >> again, we prefer to look at the egyptian deeds and they will play a constructive role in helping convince them to stop firing these thousands of rockets at our civilians. >> is your intention at the same time to continue targeting hamas leaders and to continue, if you can, killing them? >> well, we'll take any measures necessary to stop the aggression against the civilians and we're taking immense precautions not to hurt palestinian civilians. our planes have carried out hundreds of attacks and the number of palesti
's a bit of hope for a negotiated cease-fire. leaders from egypt and france are trying to mediate. for the past five days israel and hamas have fired rockets and bombed one another, israeli air strikes have taken a heavy toll on gaza and hamas. right now israel is keeping open the possibility of a ground offensive. they've got 30,000 troopons the border with another 75,000 reservists being called up. now, i want to show you something that played out live on israeli television just a short time ago. watch this. what you're called is called an iron dome. this is egypt's defensive zone system. they're tracking down two rockets. at the end, the small puffs there, that's the signals of success that those intercepters headed off those rockets. so far israel says a thousand rockets have been fired. hamas puts it at about 900. the constant threat has those in israel in fear. >> reporter: there's another attack, another rocket alert going on. we've got to get out of here. >> go, fred. there you see it. a strike in ash colon. we've got the pictures up as fred and our camera crew get out of
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